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Rose & Son London Verge Fusee "Click" to Login or Register 
IHC Life Member
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Picture of Tom Brown
posted
Just finished another early English fusee watch, this one is marked on the dial & movement Rose & Son London.

Looking in Loomes 21 ed. it shows Rose & Son of London in the mid 1750's & that they reported a lost watch in 1786.

The case unfortunately is not hallmarked, it isn't sterling silver, it feels more like nickel or some other metal, doesn't appear to be plated.

The watch doesn't have a serial number showing on the movement but each part is stamped with the number 2.

The watch keeps good time for this type of watch.

01
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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Picture of Tom Brown
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The case is a pair case.

The movement is highly decorated.

02
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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Picture of Tom Brown
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This is another view of the Rose & Son London

03
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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Picture of Tom Brown
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Another view of the engraving.

04
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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Picture of Tom Brown
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This photo is of the square shaped pillars.

Thanks for looking.

Tom

05
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
Picture of Mary Ann Scott
posted
You are building quite a nice collection of older watches! This one has beautiful engraving. I know it must be very satisfying to clean and restore them to working condition. Kudos to you for bringing them back to life!
 
Posts: 1047 | Location: The Colony, Texas in the USA | Registered: December 20, 2008
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Picture of Tom Brown
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Thanks Mary Ann, I know they are not as popular as railroad watches, which I also like, but there is something about the little chain on them & you can pick them up fairly cheap on Ebay. It just amazes me that something hand made over 200 years ago still runs like it was new. I think their value is underrated.

Tom
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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Picture of Richard M. Jones
posted
Tom, I collect railroad watches but am fascinated with fusees. I wonder if your case is pewter or Britannia metal? Years ago I had a Swiss movement that had, to my surprise, a platinum movement. The 80 year old watchmaker who told me that sure got my attention! The reason I mention platinum is that the Russian Imperial government made platinum rubles for circulation and some Spanish counterfeiters used platinum to make fake gold coins. They did not realize it had value by itself. Also nickel did not come into use in coinage until I believe the 1850's. I don't think it was a refined metal until the 19th century.


Deacon
 
Posts: 1004 | Location: Omaha, Nebraska in the USA | Registered: February 14, 2009
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Picture of Tom Brown
posted
Hi Deacon

Yeah, I don't really know what the case is made of, when I said nickel I wasn't too sure that was around at the time, doesn't have the weight of a silver case & no hallmarks so I don't really know what it is. There doesn't seem to be any wear through to another material so I would guess it is solid something.

Thanks for the comments.

Tom
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
posted
If it's a pure metal you could calculate it's density and then look it up in a table.

To find the density measure the weight (mass) of the outer case then place it in a measuring cylinder partly filled with water. Measure the displacement (volume) then divide the mass by the volume.

Most science books have density tables but, failing that, you could look it up on the Net.

Pure silver has a density of approx 10.5 gm/cm3 but this could be anything up to 12gm/cm3 depending on the quantity of alloy used.

Of course, this won't work if it's an alloy of base metals but it's worth a try. Also, don't forget that many English sterling silver cases never got hallmarked simply to avoid paying duty.

Dick
 
Posts: 57 | Location: Brisbane, Australia | Registered: January 27, 2008
posted
Another Great find Tom, where do you turn up these beauties?

The regulator is a 'Tompion' type, generally made from Sterling Silver, and the square pillars are called 'Egyptian' style.
The balance endstone is a nice unusual touch too!

Can't help with the case metal type though.

Best regards

John
 
Posts: 1282 | Location: Northern England, United Kingdom | Registered: January 07, 2006
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