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WWI Waltham XA Army Air Section Military Aircraft Clock "Click" to Login or Register 
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

We recently received this eMail question...

I have a WWI Waltham XA Army Air Section Military Aircraft Clock. I purchased this at a garage sale about 40 years ago. It does not run but it is in really good shape. Am Amish clock maker say he can fix and clean it and get it in working order for approximately $75 if it doesn’t need parts. Can you tell me the value of this clock in working order?

No images were sent at this time. I will request some in addition to asking help from our Military experts.

Thanks!

Debbie

Smile
 
Posts: 4861 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
IHC Member 1291
Picture of Buster Beck
posted
These clocks came in many styles and configurations from low jeweled to 22 Jewels, in round and square cases, metal and plastic cases, some with hack features, recording features, etc. Most were 8 day clocks made by many different companies world-wide such as Waltham, Chelsea, Seth Thomas, Junghans, Keinzle, and many others. Just about every watch show you attend today will have many different offerings to choose from, some not working, others working, some never mounted and still in their original boxes, etc. Depending on their jewel count and condition they will have prices from $100 up to $750.

These clocks graced a multitude of aircraft from P-12's, Bulldog's, Hawk's, Firefly's, Gauntlet's, Gladiator's, Goblin's, F3F's, Demon's, Fury's, Nimrod's, Peashooter's, Boomerang's, Wildcat's, Messerschmitt's, Falcon's, Fokker's, Zero's, Mustang's, Spitfire's, Tiger Cat's, Black Widow's, Shooting Star's, Fireball's, Flying Fortress',B-17's, B-29's, B-25's Apache's, Nomad's, Banshee's, Douglas O-43's, Corsair's, Duck's and even the Spruce Goose to name a few. You may not ever own one of these famous aircraft, but you can still find some of the clocks that were used by these aircraft. It will also be a lot less expensive to keep a clock or two without hangar fees, avgas, jet fuel, and high end maintenance that these planes constantly require and still have a memento from one Wink

It is difficult to price your clock without pictures to ID it. I would say that $75 sounds reasonably for a clean/oil/adjust [COA] to bring one back to life.

regards,
bb
 
Posts: 6360 | Location: Texas in the USA | Registered: July 27, 2009
posted
More information is needed. Waltham made these from around 1916 to the 1930s and the age will be a substantial factor in value. Photos of the clock along with closeups of the dial and of the movement are needed. What is the serial number on the movement inside? The back unscrews on these - there should be two little studs of metal protruding on the back plate - those are what you grasp to unscrew it if it is not too tightly screwed down. If the back is screwed too tightly to be unscrewed by finger power alone, and if you do not have the correct tool that grasps both studs to give you leverage to unscrew it, you can also put a bit of tape on the ends of some pliers that are big enough to spread their jaws to line up with the metal studs and very carefully hold the sides of the tips against the two metal studs and apply some twisting power to get the back started to unscrew. The purpose of the tape wrapping the ends of the jaws on the pliers is to protect the metal back from getting scratched.

Note that these clocks were repaired again and again and again over the years and it is not uncommon to find a movement that dates to a time different from the date indicated by the dial markings.

One of these from the 1920s era (with the correct matching dial marking of AS and US Army) and in very good condition that was in running order but that could use a servicing recently sold on Ebay for $225 which is about right for one of this vintage.
 
Posts: 862 | Location: Baltimore, Maryland USA | Registered: September 20, 2004
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

Thank you gentlemen for your responses.

To date, no images.

Will post when they are received.

Smile
 
Posts: 4861 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
posted
One other bit of information. These were generic aircraft panel clocks and were used on almost every kind of aircraft during WW 1 and for the next 10 to 15 or so years afterwards. They were used on both military and civilian aircraft. For example, there is a civilian one in the Spirit of St. Louis. While they are desirable and have some value, they not really very rare and there are usually one or two for sale on Ebay every week. Some of the sellers are a bit delusional about the values of them and have silly high starting prices and never sell for such prices. You need to ignore those auctions as being meaningless and instead look only at auctions where the items actually sold. There is a filter for seeing only items that sold on Ebay that should be used for this. When they have low starting prices they always sell and reach their market values in the bidding.
 
Posts: 862 | Location: Baltimore, Maryland USA | Registered: September 20, 2004
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