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No. 33 McCLARY'S VAN - CAST IRON STOVES "Click" to Login or Register 
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
The CPR used McClary's cast-iron stoves in all their section houses, snowplows, baggage cars, and other service equipment. Their caboose's or Van's were equipped with No. 33 McCLARY'S VAN these stoves were special as they had an oven attachment on the side of the body of the stove. They had cast-iron oven doors mounted on both sides of the oven compartment, and had the scene of a Van with a center cupola rolling down the track with smoke puffing out of the chimney. Many of these doors were salvaged when caboose's were converted to oil burning stoves, and they make attractive wall hangings. This is one from my collection showing the handle, latch, and hinges, some these were ground off leaving a rectangular picture frame, and were painted to show a rustic scene with caboose painted in the appropriate CPR colors.

Before the days of pool through cabooses, conductors and trainmen working as a crew together had their cabooses assigned. There was usually one member of the crew that did most of the cooking on way freight assignments. I worked one of these assignments earlier in my career it was called the Burstall Way freight, we would leave Swift Current, Saskatchewan on Monday morning and would be gone until Friday the tailend brakeman named Charlie did all the cooking for the four of us on the crew namely the locomotive engineer, conductor, head end and tailend brakeman. We worked long hours 16 hour days sometimes, and would all chip in $20 for the groceries Charlie would go out and do the shopping for the week and it was amazing what gourmet meals he could cook on one of these little cast-iron ovens, it was real caboose cuisine. We had roasts, potatoes, vegetables, salads, and he even baked us apple pies in these ovens, of course the rest of us would look after the dishes etc. And there was always fish and game along the right away and many good meals were provided by the crews who were avid hunters and fishermen, this was done in season of course.


Buchaneer Big Grin
IHC Charter Member 28
IHC Life Member (L7)

[This message was edited by Buchaneer on May 06, 2003 at 23:52.]

 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted
Another great tale Larry. Through your stories we gain a unique prspective on what it must have been like to actually work on the railroads!

Dr. Deborah L. Irvine

Chapter 185 Administrative Secretary
Chapter 185 Membership Coordinator
NAWCC Member 157487
IHC Member 164
IHC Life Member (L4)

 
Posts: 4835 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Thanks for this info, Larry, as it answered a question I asked just a couple of weeks ago in an antique store up in Kentucky. I saw one of these sitting in a Georgetown, Ky antique shop marked $1200, and the owner of the antique 'mall' had NO idea where it came from, what it's background was, or why the caboose was on the door. You've provided the answer for me. Thanks, my friend! Regards. Mark Cross
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
IHC Member 234
Picture of Jim Cope
posted
...enjoy your accounts very much Larry...am wondering how far East you came w/the CPR?...Jim C
 
Posts: 872 | Location: Kingsville, Ontario, Canada | Registered: April 16, 2003
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
Jim:

As far as a working crewmember on the CPR the furthest east I have worked is Swift Current, Saskatchewan. Before VIA Rail (Canada's equivalent to Amtrak) discontinued passenger service on the CPR I used to travel with my long service pass to many destinations in Canada including Vancouver BC, Montreal Québec, and Toronto ON. I see you live in Windsor ON in 1996 I was appointed to the arrangements committee for the International Convention of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers that was held in Detroit MI that year I flew in from Denver and my stepson who came to stay with me for a week came in from Canada through Windsor, we were staying in the Renaissance Center across the river from Windsor and I would get very confused watching the sun come up and set little did I realize that geographically Windsor was South of Detroit this I found out after returning home.

Larry Buchan Smile


IHC Charter Member 28
IHC Life Member (L7)
 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
posted
Mark, The McClary's were a London Ontario family that lived on the northeast corner of Dufferin and Colborne street's. They were of considerable wealth,no doubt due to the contracts with the railway and other notable companies, and owned a huge house with a rather large staff to run it. McClary's merged with five other companies (1927) and formed General Steel Wares who are well known around these parts. I find the writings on this site rather interesting because, I too, am related to a locomotive engineer (CN) who used to run freight and later passenger trains from London to Toronto, Windsor and back to London. He ran steam and deisel (1930's to 60's). Hope the blurb on McClary's will help fill in some of the blanks.
Cheers, John
 
Posts: 299 | Location: Mount Brydges, Ontario, Canada | Registered: November 10, 2005
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
I noticed that the picture of the caboose door was messing, here is a picture of a complete stove with the conductor having his cup of coffee.

 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
I have reposted the picture of my caboose oven door at the beginning of this thread.
 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Thank you, Larry!

HIGH regards! Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
posted
Sorry to drag this up again, but this topic has caught my eye! I've recently purchased one of these McClary stove/ovens like what is pictured in the photos. This one has seen some damage (cracks) and has been modified (by CPR) to burn natural gas (removed from caboose and installed in quonset hut in Calgary) and I think something important is missing when it comes to the oven 'box', but it has both doors!I believe it is missing most of the grate/shakers hardware (likely removed to install the gas burner and plumbing).
It appears to be missing the support rods for the back of the oven box.
Anyhow, your thread here has been very helpful in seeing the stove 'in use' and attachs the history to it. I have some questions about these stoves that someone may be able to answer. If you can help, please send me an email to smallblackcats@yahoo.com

Thanks alot. I've enjoyed reading the Tales from the Rails!
Russ.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Calgary, Alberta in Canada | Registered: June 08, 2009
IHC Life Member

Picture of Jerry King
posted
Good morning Russell, nice that you stopped by....

Ever think of becoming a full member of our group...? It only cost $12.00 a year and that gives you full access to all the posts throughout the site....

Tales of the Rails is but one of the many forums that we have available to you as a full member....

You can go here,Become a Memberand take care of that right now....

Take care and come back to see us....

Regards,
Jerry
 
Posts: 2828 | Location: Chino, California in the USA | Registered: June 23, 2008
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
Hello Russell:

I have seen examples of these McClary stoves converted to natural gas, I believe one of the CPR auction houses on 10th Avenue in downtown Calgary had one in their Quonset. I will e-mail you with more information.

Best regards,

Larry
 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
Picture of Edward Kitner
posted
Larry,
Another interesting and informative essay.
When I log on I always check to see if you have added to your personal library.
Thanks for all the great stories!
 
Posts: 1488 | Location: New York State in the USA | Registered: March 04, 2008
posted
hello, I just bought a house that has a complete stove like the one you guys have been talking about. Any idea what one is worth or how to get in contact with someone that might know? it is complete but it looks like someone has tried to repair some cracks or something with jb weld or the likes. any info would be great. it's a neat old stove but not much good to me, I would like to see it go to someone that would appreciate it. thanx
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Kenora, Ontario in Canada | Registered: July 10, 2009
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator

Picture of Tom Brown
posted
Ian

I did a google search McClary Manufacturing Co & found a business called Canadian Antique Stoves that sells parts & it looks like they also buy them to restore.

For everyone's reading I also found this article on the founder of the company.

Tom

stove
 
Posts: 5107 | Location: New Mexico in the USA | Registered: January 27, 2007
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