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IHC Member 376
Watchmaker
Picture of Samie L. Smith
posted
here i am again with another question for you folks..

Where can i get a suspension spring for a Ingraham clock 30 hour movement..should i try and solder this or is that a no no..it is .09mm thick X6.5mm wide and 24.40mm long..

 
Posts: 3208 | Location: Monticello, Kentucky U.S.A. | Registered: June 24, 2004
IHC Member 376
Watchmaker
Picture of Samie L. Smith
posted
2

 
Posts: 3208 | Location: Monticello, Kentucky U.S.A. | Registered: June 24, 2004
posted
NAH! You don't wanna repair a busted spring. Replace it. You can buy an assortment of leaves like that one for a few dollars or you can buy complete, assembled leaves with a long rod attached that you simply cut and bend to length. Any of the majors - SLarose, Timesavers, Merritts, etc. have them.


Howard S. McElroy
 
Posts: 8 | Location: Mesquite, Texas USA | Registered: October 04, 2005
IHC Member 376
Watchmaker
Picture of Samie L. Smith
posted
Thanks Howard i will look for a replacment i have a Slarose catalog..
 
Posts: 3208 | Location: Monticello, Kentucky U.S.A. | Registered: June 24, 2004
posted
Length and thickness of leaf are not critical altho they will affect the speed of regulation. If pendulum length is not critical - ample space - then just select one about the same length and thickness and commence regulation.


Howard S. McElroy
 
Posts: 8 | Location: Mesquite, Texas USA | Registered: October 04, 2005
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
I know this post is super old, but I need the very same part for an Ingraham 8 day clock. (I think) My clock is missing the spring altogether and I'm not sure exactly how to install it if I had one. (But I'd try if I had one.)

One question: Does the top of the suspension spring slip into the slotted post and stop or does it extend above it?


Dave Turner


 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
IHC Member 1892
posted
Dave: You will have to obtain a suspension rod and spring (any of the above suppliers) and fit it in the slotted pin. They are held in place by either a dimple in the top of the spring (see pics above of the broken spring and you will see the marks the split pin has made on the spring. Just above that there is a small dimple made in the spring). Another way is to punch a tiny hole in the top of the spring and fit a tiny wire through it This wire will do the same job as the dimple. New springs will usually have one or the other so you will not have to do it.
Good luck with it.
 
Posts: 355 | Location: Kincardine, Ontario in Canada | Registered: November 25, 2013
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
Thanks John, That helps immensely. Since I didn't have the spring I wasn't sure where the top of the spring ended. But you have confirmed that for me.
I do still have the rod, so I thought maybe I could buy the spring independently.


Dave Turner


 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
IHC Life Member
Picture of Patrick Wallin
posted
If you have a MS punch and scrap Ms's laying around you could make one. You may have to use a little heat to help in the bending. You can also buy spring wire on line and bend your own.
 
Posts: 1732 | Location: Enumclaw, Washington in the USA | Registered: October 02, 2011
IHC Member 43
posted
Samie, If you haven't found the suspension spring and rod yet, send me an email to the address in my profile with your address and the length of the rod and I will send you one.

Curly
 
Posts: 250 | Location: Ashland, Wisconsin U.S.A. | Registered: November 22, 2002
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
Thanks guys,
I did find a suspension spring with attached rod and have the clock running. But I'm not sure that what I have is original to this movement. I have now lowered the pendulum as low as it will go, (without scraping the bottom of the case) and it's still running fast.
So now, I'm wondering what's next. Heavier pendulum? stiffer suspension spring?
This is all new territory for me.


Dave Turner
 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
IHC Member 1892
posted
Dave. Is the movement original to the case it is in now and is the pendulum original to the movement.
 
Posts: 355 | Location: Kincardine, Ontario in Canada | Registered: November 25, 2013
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
I'm pretty sure it is original including the pendulum. But, I can't be absolutely sure. I did manage to lower the pendulum another smidge. We'll see what happens.


Dave Turner


 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
Picture of Bill Carlson
posted
Try a little heavier pendulum bob if you have one. That may just do the trick.
This what Timesaver's show in their catalog!


Bill Carlson


 
Posts: 431 | Location: Billings, Montana USA | Registered: February 05, 2007
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
Thanks Bill,
I should have updated this post. I do have the bob fairly low on the pendulum, but I now have it adjusted for keeping accurate time.
And I'm pretty sure it's all original parts except for the new suspension spring I installed from Timesavers. It may be a little longer than the original.
Appreciate all the input.


Dave Turner
 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
Life Member
posted
I know this is an older thread, but just in case any "newbies" are reading, here's a suggestion for slowing down those replacement suspension rods from Merrits and Timesavers (which nearly always seem to be stiffer than the originals): Using a block of wood, hold the edge of the spring flat against the side of your block, and sand the edge down, making the spring narrower. I like to use 400 grit wet or dry, which I get from an automotive parts store, and back it with a piece of glass, for a nice flat surface. (I use the same wet or dry paper to renew my pivot burnishing tool after each clock.)
 
Posts: 213 | Location: Westminster, Maryland in the USA | Registered: March 02, 2015
posted
Hello. I'm new here and know very little about clocks. These old threads describe a problem similar to mine.

I need to replace a broken suspension spring on an Ingraham square face mission pendulum wall clock, manufactured 9/07. Not sure but there seems to be a remnant of the original spring still attached to the pendulum rod. Its size is ¼” by ¾”. I do not know the original length of the spring which would affect the total length of the pendulum and the regulation.

I think the suspension spring /rod is to be hung (attached) on a “L” piece of stiff 16 ga “wire” which pivots on one end through a hole in the backplate. The spring would attach I think to the opposite end. Just how might be clear if I had the missing part of the spring or a photo of the original working clockwork.

I need to know more before I fashion a new spring. Or, if possible, find the perfect replacement perhaps from Timesavers. Can you help me? See the attached photo.

TimelyFool

"wire", spring, rod
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Illinois in the USA | Registered: January 01, 2017
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
If you search for "suspension rod" you can find what you're looking for. This clock is not that particular about a replacement part. These also come with a straight long rod attached, which you can cut and bend to fit.
Here's an example of one also: suspension rod

Can you post a picture showing the full length of the rod you have? Does it have a bend on the end to hang the pendulum?

note: After studying your picture, it looks to me like you could use the suspension you have. Just put it back in the slot on the post. And I also notice the crutch wire hold down is laying loose. The horizontal wire with the right angle bend going into the frame on the left side. The loose end needs to be on the post that hold the anchor secure.


Dave Turner
 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
posted
Thanks for your quick response.

My suspension rod terminates in a “T” upon which the pendulum shaft hangs with a double hook. I believe yours ends in a 90 degree bend.

But I may have solved the mystery. I had thought that the spring / rod somehow attaches to the part I call the “L” shaped “wire” for lack of the correct term. But just now I noticed a split in the end in the metal post you see right above the spring in my photograph. Could the spring slide into that split and hang from the post? If so, I still wonder if the spring I have is complete or is there a piece missing, broken off the end? Perhaps you know. And what is the correct name and function of the “wire”?

I have attached another photo showing the “wire” and the suspension rod.

 
Posts: 6 | Location: Illinois in the USA | Registered: January 01, 2017
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
The protruding post with the split is the where the thin 1/4" spring hangs. The L shaped wire holds the anchor on it's post above. Slide the flat end over the end of the post and hold it in place by pushing the other end of the wire through the fram until it's secure.

Here's a picture: Ingraham movement


Dave Turner
 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
posted
Thank you Dave. You instruction are very clear. I guess I was overthinking this problem. The solution was staring me in the face. Discovered what looks like an exact replacement from timesaver. Herschede Suspension Spring
(#12712) $3.50@. Will order two. Replace the original and a second as a spare. Sorry to say I cannot get your photo to open. Access Denied.

Once again. Thank you for your help this New Year's Day. Michael
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Illinois in the USA | Registered: January 01, 2017
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
Happy New Year.


Dave Turner
 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

Dave,

The image of the Ingraham movement does not open for me either.

Debbie

 
Posts: 4906 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
Picture of Dave Turner
posted
Not sure why it won't open. It does open for me.
How about this?


Dave Turner


 
Posts: 1978 | Location: Wilson, North Carolina in the USA | Registered: November 15, 2011
posted
Dave, Dr. Irvine, et al. Many thanks. The problem was solved thanks to Dave who emailed me directly with his photo and advice. The solution was obvious but not to me. I have been away from clocks for almost 50 years. I wrongly thought that the suspension spring attached somehow to the "wire" not to the slotted metal post next to it. The "wire" (for lack of the correct term) is there to hold in place the verge rocker by covering the end of the shaft upon which it pivots. One big "...well duhhhh" for me. So happy IHC was there to help. So glad I joined. Michael
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Illinois in the USA | Registered: January 01, 2017
posted
To add. My original spring was bent but 100% intact. But I will replace it just the same. A part which looks very much like the original is the Herschede Suspension Spring Item #12712 from TimeSavers. Will buy two, one as a spare.

So I guess I will be ready soon to reinstall the cleaned and lubed clockwork back to its case. Thanks. Michael
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Illinois in the USA | Registered: January 01, 2017
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

Thanks Dave for your input as well as the image.

 
Posts: 4906 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
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