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Can one make a clock gong louder? "Click" to Login or Register 
posted
This EN Welch clock I just got circa 1886 has a beautiful low deep mellow tone but its sort of a quiet one. The striker I notice strikes the coil sorta at an angle instead of dead on. Not to the left or right but it just comes down low like an airplane. And I notice it don't really have a lot of movement when it does strike. I would call that maybe less than half inch.
Thanks, Stevan Tiffin
 
Posts: 65 | Location: Mississippi in the USA | Registered: March 16, 2008
Picture of Greg Reeves
posted
You can try to strengthen the spring that "charges" the hammer mechanism.

greg
 
Posts: 497 | Location: Genoa, New York U.S.A. | Registered: November 06, 2003
posted
Well Greg, that makes sense but how do you make the spring that "charges" the hammer stronger? Would you make it shorter? Replace it with a shorter one or same length but heavier? And should I do this, I would assume it would take more energy or "work" by some part or parts behind the hammer to "cock" or charge the hammer? Would the wire the hammer is attached to be under more stress to the point that it could bend? How would that affect the pad on the hammer that strikes the rod? And how about the affects to the other parts that are behinf the hammer? Is this a common procedure? I just want to be sure that should I do this I don't cause problems.
Thank You,
Steve Tiffin
 
Posts: 65 | Location: Mississippi in the USA | Registered: March 16, 2008
Picture of Greg Reeves
posted
First, you can always save the old spring and change it back if you want to.

I would start by attempting to locate a different spot for the attachment of the end of the spring. Usually, you can pull the end and attach it somewhere further away from the coil. If you cannot do this...try to "unwind" the spring one coil and then locate a spot for attachment that will provide more power to the hammer.

You can do any of the things you mentioned...I cannot see the spring, so do not know the particulars. Yes, by strengthening the spring, it will take more power to pull/push the cock. Obviously if it takes too much power, you simply change it back.

greg
 
Posts: 497 | Location: Genoa, New York U.S.A. | Registered: November 06, 2003
posted
I have been advised by a clocksmith to simply install something harder such as wood or brass in the hammer instead of the leather that is there now. He advised me to experiment with various materials....
 
Posts: 65 | Location: Mississippi in the USA | Registered: March 16, 2008
Honorary Life Member
Internet Consultant
posted
Hi Stevan,

Check the place where the gong is mounted and make sure it's really solid. The sound comes mostly from the case of the clock. Try striking an unmounted gong and you will see what I mean. Also, check the joints in the case. You lose sound if anything is wobbly.

See if you can move the gong a bit so the hammer strikes more squarely.

I know of a few ways to harden a leather hammer. Age will do it. So will heating with a match until it blackens a little. You can also apply a couple of drops of super glue, and then press it against waxed paper for a half minute or so. Careful with that last one. If it's too hard you might increase the "attack" to a point where you lose your mellow.

Good luck,
Tom
 
Posts: 41 | Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin U.S.A. | Registered: November 22, 2002
posted
Thanks Tom,
You are right! The case was loose on one side, The gong was tight but I turned it a little one way and it now hits the sweet spot. Its just a little bit lounder but so much more of a clear mellow richer tone.
Thanks!! Stevan Tiffin
 
Posts: 65 | Location: Mississippi in the USA | Registered: March 16, 2008
Honorary Life Member
Internet Consultant
posted
I love it when a plan comes together Smile
 
Posts: 41 | Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin U.S.A. | Registered: November 22, 2002
posted
Hello
Try these easy tip. The hammer should strike the gong close to where it is staked. what really makes the hammer strike the gong is inertia. When the hammer arm stops the hammer head is still moving the arm gives (flexes) and that is how the hammer should strike the gong. Make sure the gong is tightly mounted in the case also. Hope this helps Cheers bill@fixoclox
 
Posts: 8 | Location: Long Island, New York in the USA | Registered: April 26, 2008
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