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posted
I just found out that Nikon offers a ring light that fits my Coolpix 995. It is Macro Cool-light SL-1. It attaches to the lens and was designed for macro use. It is a continuous light and not a flash. I am going to give it a try. It uses 8 white LEDs. I wonder if anyone knows the white balance setting for LEDs?
 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
IHC Life Member
RR Watch Expert
Picture of Ed Ueberall
posted
Jerry,
Since the ring light is a Nikon product, a query to the Nikon website may yield their recommendations on the best white balance settings to use on your 995.
Let us know how the setup works out.


Ed Ueberall
IHC Member 34
The Escapement
 
Posts: 622 | Location: Pooler, Georgia in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 23, 2002
posted
Ed: I don't have the light yet, but the Nikon company suggests using the automatic setting for the white balance>
 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
posted
Well, I have to declare the use of the ring light a failure. Here is an image using the built in flash on my Nikon 995.

 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
posted
Here is one taken with the ring light. How do I get rid of the refltions?

 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
posted
Here is the movement using the ring light.

 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
IHC Life Member
RR Watch Expert
Picture of Ed Ueberall
posted
Jerry,
Just a suggestion. If there is enough clearance, place the lens right in the opening of the top of a plastic milk jug, so that the ring lights are outside of the jug. This might diffuse the ringlight enough that the lighting is more even, eliminating the hotspots that they are creating.


Ed Ueberall
IHC Member 34
The Escapement
 
Posts: 622 | Location: Pooler, Georgia in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 23, 2002
posted
Ed: I followed your advice and made a diffuser from a plastic milk jug. I lit it with two lamps from the left and right. I have posted the pictures in the photo gallery. I would appreciate your comments.
 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
IHC Life Member
RR Watch Expert
Picture of Ed Ueberall
posted
Jerry,
The new scans are definitly an improvement, but I would make a couple of suggestions.

First, if you are using a tripod or copy stand where camera shake is not a problem, I would set my camera to "Aperture Priority" and stop the camera down to about two stops from the smallest aperture (the highest f/stop number). This will increase your depth of field and allow a greater depth to be in sharp focus.

Second, phtograph the watch when it is not running, to eliminate any vibration due to the moving balance and to allow the balance to be in sharp focus.

Third, Use an editing program to correct things like color balance, brightness and contrast.
As an example, I took one of your scans and made some quick changes to it, with the following result.
http://static.flickr.com/33/45923015_19dcd82356.jpg
I still feel that you need more light diffusion. Don't use any ceiling lights that may create hotspots coming in from the diffuser opening on the top. Make sure that all of the side lighting is going through the milk carton, and have the lights angled down slightly to illuminate the bottom portions of the movement.


Ed Ueberall
IHC Member 34
The Escapement
 
Posts: 622 | Location: Pooler, Georgia in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 23, 2002
posted
Ed: I fooled around with the picture of the dial. I like the results which made the dial whiter.

 
Posts: 769 | Location: Los Osos, California USA | Registered: December 12, 2002
posted
It has been a long time since 'Lighting' was discussed in this sub-forum, and since everyone likes to see pictures, I thought I would post three pictures of what seems to work for me. This set-up idea came from this forum. First the picture itself and them the setup I used to take it:

 
Posts: 832 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee in the USA | Registered: September 02, 2009
posted
Next the set-up (side view)....

 
Posts: 832 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee in the USA | Registered: September 02, 2009
posted
....and the set-up (top view).

I like this method because it it so cheap and simple.

A digital camera with a macro lens capability (for taking close-ups) is a necessity. The simple, cigarette pack size cameras out today often have macro lenses built in.

Next, unless you have software for manipulating photos (cropping, re-sizing, etc), you will want to fill the view finder with your subject as much as you can yet keeping your subject in focus. Use wide angle settings, no telephoto.

If you shake, you will need a tripod and a camera with either a 10 second delay after you press the shutter button, or a camera with cable release capability; either way, you'll want to use a tripod if you shake. Take several photos and use only your best. Never let'em see your mistakes!

The picture above was taken with a Nikon Coolpix S570 on sale yesterday for $149.00 at Office Max, BestBuy and many more outlets.

 
Posts: 832 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee in the USA | Registered: September 02, 2009
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