WWT Shows CLICK TO: Join and Support Internet Horology Club 185™ IHC185™ Forums

• Check Out Our... •
• TWO Book Offer! •
Go
New Topic
Find-Or-Search
Notify
Tools
Reply to Post
  
Early 1900s wristwatch movement ID help... Elgin, Waltham, Swiss??? "Click" to Login or Register 
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Early 1900s wristwatch movement ID help... Elgin, Waltham, Swiss???

trying to id this movement.
Circa 1914 maybe earlier maybe later
It is a private label watch - the name is blocked out so as not to waste anyone's time looking them up.
I have tried for months on line and all there is is a 1913 and a 1914 newspaper ad.


Roddy JB


 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
IHC Member 1342
posted
Hi Roddy. Looks Swiss to me. Maybe Longines?


Marc Micale
 
Posts: 143 | Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the USA | Registered: September 16, 2009
IHC Member 1892
posted
Hi Roddy and Marc: I suggest you check out site "Vintage Watch Straps" run by David Boettcher. Go to his site and click on tab "Tech" and then "Movement Identification". In that section you will find an early Omega that appears to me to be like yours. It also has a picture of the keyless work which would be the defining moment. Good luck with it and if possible I would like to see a picture of the Keyless Works. John
 
Posts: 354 | Location: Kincardine, Ontario in Canada | Registered: November 25, 2013
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Thanks Marc.


Roddy JB
 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Thanks John.
That was the first place I looked but I didn't find it the first time. I can't believe I missed it before.
A pic of the keyless works would be difficult as that would require removal from the case & removing the hands. My clumsy fingers & delicate watch hands do not get along. I don't want to risk ruining a 105 yr old working watch.
Rod


Roddy JB


 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
IHC Member 1892
posted
You are welcome Roddy. I might add I have sent pictures to David before re. other movements and he has graciously replied and usually with information on the movement. He is a pretty busy guy and it may take awhile but it is usually worthwile to ask his opinion. Let us know if you nail it down. John
 
Posts: 354 | Location: Kincardine, Ontario in Canada | Registered: November 25, 2013
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Hi John,
I'm guessing the only way to absolutely 'nail it down' is to remove the dial. I won't be attempting that. If there were no hands, I would.
I have emailed David once before and found him to be very helpful.
Rod


Roddy JB
 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
posted
Really the only sure way to identify movement is by examining the setting parts, what we in the watch parts business call "fingerprinting". I would go with Longines as the fishscale or spotted finish is fairly typical. Swiss movement origin can be tricky to identify if made before WWII.
 
Posts: 653 | Location: St Paul, Minnesota in the USA | Registered: May 04, 2004
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Thanks Wiliam,
I guess I'll have to take to a watchmaker to get at the 'fingerprints'. No sense in me taking the chance of wrecking the original hands.
I just posted a similar query on a Circa 1922 Safety Barrel movement...


Roddy JB
 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
IHC Member 561
posted
Roddy, to me it looks like a Swiss Cyma/Tavannes movement. I have seen a few in trench style watches and this one has a train bridge like Cyma.
 
Posts: 776 | Location: Tijeras, New Mexico USA | Registered: July 12, 2005
posted
Best way to ID is under the dial. The train bridge is not reliable. It looks like an Elgin or a hundred other train bridges. Much of what we do in the watch material business is identifying movements. ID by setting parts is still the surest way. That "fingerprinting" method goes back to the 1890s.
 
Posts: 653 | Location: St Paul, Minnesota in the USA | Registered: May 04, 2004
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
Okay, I'll try to get the hands & dial off without wrecking the hands. It may be a week or so before I can do that. Afterwards, I'll have to take the watch in to have them reinstalled.


Roddy JB
 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
IHC Life Member
Picture of Roddy J. Brunton
posted
I am almost ready to touch/remove the hands...


Roddy JB
 
Posts: 1365 | Location: Richmond, British Columbia in Canada | Registered: January 07, 2009
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


©2002-2021 Internet Horology Club 185™ - Lindell V. Riddle President - All Rights Reserved Worldwide

Internet Horology Club 185™ is the "Family-Friendly" place for Watch and Clock Collectors