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Steam locomotive operations in modern times "Click" to Login or Register 
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
During June 1999 my friend Jim Bauman and I had the privilege and honour of accompanying the Union Pacific Steam Team on a trip they made from Cheyenne WY to Roseville CA. The train consisted of two steam locomotives UP 844 & UP3985 that were double heading, along with 15 passenger coaches that were deadheading to Roseville. They were going to be used by the Union Pacific to commemorate the opening of a new classification yard, and then to participate at Rail Fair in Sacramento. On the first day out we tied up at Rock Springs WY, and on the second day we went to Ogden UT. During our layover at Ogden I was riding on the UP 844 with Locomotive engineer Steve Lee and I asked him what kind of watch he used, he replied that he use his wristwatch which he showed me. The thought of the man running the world's largest operating steam locomotive UP 3985 that was manufactured during the 1940s with a with a modern wristwatch was more than I could bear, so I sold him my Hamilton Ball 999 B. If you ever see the UP 844, or the UP 3985 in your travels you will know it is being timed by " The Railroad Timekeeper of America" or you could say he carries a Ball and times them all wink

Buchaneer
 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
posted
Very interesting Larry. Keep 'em comeing!

Aaron Bereiter
NAWCC# 156432
Very Proud IHC Charter #55
 
Posts: 945 | Location: Geneva, Illinois in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 19, 2002
Picture of Tom Seymour
posted
Larry, I enjoyed reading the story. If you have more......let's have them!!

NAWCC #41293
Internet Horology Chapter #104
Interim Exec. V.P. of IHC
 
Posts: 2537 | Location: Mount Angel, Oregon in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 19, 2002
posted
In my short life I saw the Burlington 0-5A's in motion, in the roundhouse and on the rip-track. When they were on the rip-track we, as kids, stole the torpedos and flags from the cabs. The bells were long gone. We were too young and stupid to take the number plates, whistles and guages. I can remember at least 12 in a line waiting for the scrapper. All complete with sand still in the domes.

Jim
 
Posts: 84 | Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA | Registered: November 20, 2002
posted
My Mother was a Canadian citizen that became an American citizen. We continued to go to a small Canadian town that the CP and CNR traveled through. We'd put pennies on the rails. Old US steamers. I once watched a young engineer climb from his locomotive and spit on the rods to see if they were too hot...

Jim
 
Posts: 84 | Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA | Registered: November 20, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Up to, and including my father, all our family have been connected with the Norfolk and Western Railway, and on my mother's side, the Durham and Southern Railroad in North Carolina, so railroad watches and the love of railroading have been an intergral part of my life since I was a tike. I remember my dad taking us down to the yard to watch Y-6b's jerking long stings of coal cars (not hoppers on the N&W!) out of the Scioto Division, and 0-8-0 switchers crowning freight trains with their caboose's just before the train pulled out. As Lindell and I have discussed off line, railroaders seemed to have as much debate regarding what was the best watch as those who collect and drive Chevys and Fords. You were either an Elgin man, or a Hamilton man on the N&W. All others were 'wannabes' as far as they were concerned. (not to be saying ANYTHING against other railroad watch collectors or manufacturers. That's just how it was in my town.) My family was an Elgin family, so I never even SAW a real Hamilton railroad watch until I was in my late 20's, and handled one that was in the collection of a friend. It was a 992, and had sadly been recased in a base metal case, but the rest of the watch was correct and running well. I am still impressed with that watch....but guess I'll remain an Elgin man myself. It's hard to break family tradition. (grins) Just to keep this post to topic, when the Chessie painted Reading T-1 passed through South Shore, Ky, on it's way to it's firey end in the round house fire in Covington, I watched the Engineer climb down to talk to the conductor, and both pulled their watches. One had a Hamilton, but the other an Elgin. Interesting to see this was still a division of interests all these many years later. Regards. M.Cross (p.s. Needless to say, I ENVY you your ride, Mr. Buchaneer!!!)
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
posted
When I was a kid in central British Columbia, we lived along the PGE (Pacific Great Eastern) or more apptly (Prince George Eventually) I remember seeing the smoke from the old coal burners coming for several miles and would rush over to the track to wave to the Engineer. There is a story of a couple waiting in Quesnel BC for the 11am train and at exactly 11:03 it chugged into the station. The couple congratulated the conductor for the train being on time. "On time?" he said, "this is yesterdays train!!!"
The PGE was purchased by the Provincial Government of British Columbia and was changed to BC Rail.
One of the research projects that I have planned is the history of the PGE. The railway that started in the middle of nowhere and ended in the middle of nowhere (in the early days)

NAWCC 157316
IHC 155
 
Posts: 39 | Location: Calgary, Alberta Canada | Registered: November 23, 2002
Railway Historian
IHC Life Member
Site Moderator
Picture of Larry Buchan
posted
wink Brent another name for the PGE was "Please Go Easy"

Buchaneer
 
Posts: 3370 | Location: Okotoks Alberta Canada | Registered: November 22, 2002
Picture of Sam Williamson
posted
Ah,Buchaneer,I envy you.Thanks for the great stories,they seem to bring forth the memories of others as well.You're one hell of a conductor! big grin

Sam Williamson
NAWCC 154312
IHC 14
Member Chapter 96
 
Posts: 618 | Location: Northwestern Florida in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 27, 2002
IHC President
Life Member
Picture of Lindell V. Riddle
posted
Everyone,

This is exceeding even my hopes, and I find every word fascinating. We are rapidly becoming the Horological Discussion Site of choice, and it's largely bacause of the great attitude all of you convey and interesting topics like this one!

Keep the good times rollin' on the rails,

Lindell V. Riddle, Interim President
NAWCC Internet Horology Chapter

NAWCC Life Member# 253-150074
Member of Chapters 10, 28, 37 and 174
Proud Charter Member Number 003 of the IHC

ihc185@roadrunner.com

Phone: (440) 461-0167
 
Posts: 10552 | Location: Northeastern Ohio in the USA | Registered: November 19, 2002
Past Administrator
IHC Life Member
Picture of Jim Wallace
posted
Links to information on the Union Pacific Steam Locos Larry got to ride on:

UP844
UP3985

 
Posts: 141 | Location: Near Anchorage, Alaska USA | Registered: November 19, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
My great aunt was clerk to the station agent at Apex, NC for many years back in the 40's. I'd sure like to get to a link if you can find another good one. Thanks again! Regards. Mark Cross (Oh, that picture of the UP engine was a GREAT photo to see first thing in the morning!)
P.S. Never mind. On a second try, it came up. GREAT info!!! More family history revealed for me!
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Past Administrator
IHC Life Member
Picture of Jim Wallace
posted
Mark..
Another D&S link D&S

Apex N.C.

Chessie T-1 T-1
Another T-1T-1

Jim
 
Posts: 141 | Location: Near Anchorage, Alaska USA | Registered: November 19, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
I was never a fan until I saw it in South Shore, Ky that day. When it pulled out, the sound of the exhaust from it's stack echoed off the top of the hills behind us, and sounded like two shotguns being fired within seconds of each other. The N&W class J 4-8-4 didn't make that much noise when it pulled out of Portsmouth that same summer, and it had an even HEAVIER load on it's drawbar. (Of course the J was a heavy weight passenger 'Northern', compared to the freight pulling T-1) Brings back memories of the smell of coal smoke, the scream of popping safety valves, and the weight of a good railroad pocketwatch riding heavy in your watch pocket. Mmmm, mmm. Regards. Mark Cross
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Picture of Paul Anderson
posted
Here in Sarnia, in a local park, they have #6069 stuffed and mounted. Rocky Mountain class, 4-6-0 if memory serves? Built in the forties, beautiful engine. Rotting to pieces:( One of these days, I'm going to get some people together to try and restore that thing, like they did for #6213 in Toronto. I was involved with a project to restore 6213 to steam and establish a railway museum out of the John St. roundhouse in downtown Toronto, but I kind of think the project has since died.

Oh well, just have to be satisfied with 3-1/2" gauge these days.

---
Paul Anderson
NAWCC Member #156973
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Sarnia, Ontario, Canada | Registered: November 25, 2002
Picture of Tom Seymour
posted
You can see this enginge whenever you want!! I wish they had a person in the picture so you can get a scale of the size of this thing. IT IS HUGE!!!! Look at the full size cabin to the right side of the picture. It was awsome when I was a kid standing next to it. It remains awesome today. It is at Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI along with several other trains and stuff to numerous to mention. Also, some watches. One of Henry Ford's hobbies was repairing watches.

The info on the back of the postcard states:
The Allegheny was one of the largest steam locomotives ever built. It weighs 600 tons and is 125 feet long. The locomotive was built in 1941 in Lima, Ohio, for the Chesapeake & Ohio R.R. The C&O's fleet of Allegheny locomotives was used to bring coal over the Allegheny Mountains from West Virginia to the manufacaturing centers of the North. These engines could haul 160 cars- each with a 60 ton load- at speeds averaging 40 to 50 miles per hour. By 1956 all the Alleghenys had been retired, replaced by more economical diesel locomotives. Number 1601 was the second Allegheny constructed and came to the museum in 1956, after logging 407,008 miles of service.

NAWCC #41293
Internet Horology Chapter #104
Interim Exec. V.P. of IHC
 
Posts: 2537 | Location: Mount Angel, Oregon in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 19, 2002
Picture of Stu Goldstein
posted
My rides were on a yard engine in the flats of Cleveland, Ohio in 1955. I was 19, working swing in Heat Treating at the American Steel & Wire Division of US Steel. On graveyards I’d eat my lunch sitting on the loading platform to get some air and the engineer on the yarder would often pick me up and let me ride with him ‘til my lunch hour was over. God Bless that man.
 
Posts: 355 | Location: Northern Idaho in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 26, 2002
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
I once had a good friend (long since passed on, rest his soul) who worked in the Russell, Ky C&O yard, and participated in a timed test run of one of these monsters up the Northern Ohio run from the Russell yard to Columbus, Ohio. They ran the Allegheny with only a caboose on it's drawbar northward, and wanted to see just how fast a run they could make with a caboose hop. He was responsible in keeping the time (using his Hamilton 992B, by the way), and helping the secondary fireman sit in the top of the tender kick coal down into the worm screw feeding the booster. He said it was a trip he'll never forget, and the terror he felt riding behind a REAL monster at full gallop. He didn't remember the final time, but they shaved almost an hour off the regular run. He didn't remember why they were even doing the run either. Regards. Mark Cross

NAWCC Member 157508
NAWCC-IHC Member 163
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
IHC Life Member
Picture of John D. Duvall
posted
Tom,

Here's a different view of 1601 with some people. IT IS BIG!

 
Posts: 1123 | Location: Arizona U.S.A. | Registered: January 21, 2003
Picture of Donald E. Jones
posted
Larry,
Last month, I had the good fortune to meet some of the crew and get a short cab ride on UP844. They were on the Texas leg of the latest tour, and were preparing the engine for an overnight layover at Palastine, TX. While I didn't meet Steve Lee, I did meet some of the other crewmen, and was treated quite cordially. I am ashamed to say I don't remember their names, but I was invited to ride with them while they backed the train on to a little spur track for the night. Being a steam buff, I have been on a number of steam engines, but I had never ridden on one before --- I loved it. Some of my observations of the 844 are as follows. Although it had a good paint job, It still has all the battle scars it has accumulated over a long life. Even though it is a bit rough cosmetically, it is obviously in perfect mechanical condition, and could as easily hit the century + mark as ever. I was impressed by the roomy cab, it is enormous. Most steam locomotives I have seen are a bit cramped in the cab, but not this one. The UP 800's may not be the most powerful, or largest 4-8-4's, but they were still world class engines!


D. E. Jones


 
Posts: 73 | Location: Sulphur Springs, Texas USA | Registered: June 29, 2006
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Ah! A man after my own heart....one who carries railroad pocket watches, a railroader to the core (though I never took my railroad job offer Frown), and a wearer of fedoras! All you need now is to drive a 1950's era MOPAR, and we're cut out of the same cloth, Donald! Big Grin Smile

HIGH regards! Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Picture of Donald E. Jones
posted
Mark,
Ain't it a shame! Seems like so much of the old stuff from the past is just better. My wife always complains when I go on a diatribe about how much better things were in the past, and how much I would have like to lived in an earlier time. She says no way it was better in the past, and would I really like to give up the easy living we have today. She has a pretty sound argument, I guess. While I don't have an old Mopar,my son has a 1970 Cuda 383 that he restored from the ground up, looks better than new. If I could have the Mopar of my choice, it would be a 1957 Chrysler 300. How does that sound?


D. E. Jones
 
Posts: 73 | Location: Sulphur Springs, Texas USA | Registered: June 29, 2006
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Well, you're in the ballpark. I drive a 50 Plymouth special Deluxe with a 217 flathead 6. I can go from 'zero to 60' in 5 miles. Big Grin

I hear you, my friend, and TOTALLY agree, but fortunately my wife of 30 years agrees with me about things not being like the USED to be, and in MANY aspects, the main thing being that the simpler points are what we miss the most. Things like a handshake being your bond, rather than worrying about litigation and getting lawyers involved for the simplest of tasks. That's why you'll enjoy your membership here. Folks words are their bond at this site. It's a breath of fresh air, let me tell you!

Regards! Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Picture of Donald E. Jones
posted
Mark,
Is your Plymouth restored, or does it have a nice "patina" on it?


D. E. Jones
 
Posts: 73 | Location: Sulphur Springs, Texas USA | Registered: June 29, 2006
posted
I read a post by Paul Anderson about CNR 6069 and I'm just wondering if any work was done to the engine or not? It good to know that someone care about the old girl.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Kingsville, Ontario, Canada | Registered: July 11, 2006
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
Hi Don! Sorry I fell off radar. Roll Eyes

My Plymouth is restored......sort of.... WinkIt's been converted from 6v to 12v, and brought up to standards for a daily driver. A new paint job has been recently applied, but it's currently down for front brake work (new cylinders, brake hoses, etc.). Once that's done, it's back on the road with it.

Regards! Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Picture of Stephan Gaal
posted
Just found this thread and thought I would share my upcoming wedding plans. I am getting married on Puffing Billy, a 2ft6inch line that runs up into the Dandenong Ranges just out of Melbourne. The train will leave just after noon and we will have the first half of the reception as we climb up into the hills behind G42 their only narrow gauge Garrett loco. Our cars will be cut off at a park where the official part will take place. A later return train behind an Na engine (2-6-2 tank engine similar to a Baldwin) will collect us and the second half of the festivities will occure as we wind our way back down the hills to the terminus. We also plan to have period costume with a vest etc. All I need to do now is to select an appropriate watch for the occasion. Which one would you use?
 
Posts: 431 | Location: South Victoria, Australia | Registered: January 18, 2007
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
First of all, CONGRATULATIONS!!!! Smile

Second of all, you need to post a photo of you, your blushing bride, and the steamer in the background!! We ALL want to see!

Third, what do you have in your collection for us to 'consider' as a carry watch for the occasion? Bear in mind, once you choose, it will become an heirloom, so it will need to be something you'll want to keep for a lifetime.

HIGH regards, and best wishes!!

Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
IHC Vice President
Pitfalls Moderator
IHC Life Member
Picture of Edward L. Parsons, Jr.
posted
Congrats Stephan! Big Grin

Like Mark, I'd love to see some pictures of you and your new bride, where you went and the train as well.

I'm sure I speak for all of Chapter 185 in wishing you & yours all the best.


Best Regards,

Ed
 
Posts: 6696 | Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania, USA | Registered: April 19, 2004
Picture of Stephan Gaal
posted
Thanks all for your kind remarks. I must admit I am looking forward to the day myself. Not long now. For those interested in the railway here is a link. Billy The cars we will be using are the ones normally used for the luncheon special. All the staff have been great and could not have helped us more. As for the watch my collection has a bit of everything in it so it is more the type. A Dollar Watch would not do the job. I suppose a Railway watch could be appropriate. I have 4. A nice 23j Hampden railway special. There is a Hamilton 992B. A 17j Ball Waltham with official RR Standard on the dial and a very nice railway loco on the back of the case.
Last and oldest is a 17j Hampden special railway with a 2 tone movement in a hunter case. Then again it is a wedding so perhaps a dress watch is the go. I have a very nice kw/ks watch from G.E Gerard in New York in a fancy gold case with enamel paterns on the outside. 14 size I think Very elegent but don't know much about it. Last contender is an early kw waltham in a silver hunter case. The first watch I succesfully repaired even if it was just a clean and a new main spring. So which would you choose?
 
Posts: 431 | Location: South Victoria, Australia | Registered: January 18, 2007
IHC Member 163
Picture of Mark Cross
posted
My vote is for the 17j Hampden Special Railway in the hunter case.

I fondness for that particular model. I carry my open face 17j 18s SR, an 1894 graduate of Hampden quite often.

Regards! Mark
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: Estill Springs, Tennessee, USA | Registered: December 02, 2002
Picture of Stephan Gaal
posted
Hello all,
Here I am back again as a married man. Everything went to plan and all had a good time. I suspect the Loco is of most interest to you all so here it is.

 
Posts: 431 | Location: South Victoria, Australia | Registered: January 18, 2007
Picture of Stephan Gaal
posted
If you have steam in your veins then a cab ride is about as good as it gets. How much better if your new bride comes with you. It doesn't get much better. The driver took this picture with a camera borrowed from a guest. We did the flower thing then rode off down the yard in the engine.

 
Posts: 431 | Location: South Victoria, Australia | Registered: January 18, 2007
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