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What does a "complete" staking set look like for watch repair? "Click" to Login or Register 
posted
What does a "complete" staking set look like for watch repair?

I have seen a number of staking sets for sale. Is there a definitive number of stakes in a set for pocket watches and another for wrist watches? Then you have the question of numbers on the stake associated with a particular stake to be used. Is there a # and description of each stake for each brand/manufacture? The reason for all these questions is that they may/may not have been answered before. I bought on (you know where) for a mere pippins of 100 bucks Some rust included & a 100 stakes and other useful bits including a brass extractor to remove a stake from its placement on the round holder! The manufacture is stamped - E. RIVETT. PAT FEB 4 1890. I have no idea the length of time of manufacturing of this set. I restored this staking set back to operational condition No piece were damaged or missing.....see attached pictures
Jim Lennartz

 
Posts: 30 | Location: Evergreen, Colorado in the USA  | Registered: January 21, 2018
posted
The finished look after rust removal by hand and lapping mirror finish where required.

a cut dimond now
 
Posts: 30 | Location: Evergreen, Colorado in the USA  | Registered: January 21, 2018
IHC Member 2030
posted
Nice restoration Vincent.
Please tell about the clean and polish procedure.
Google ‘staking set’ for some good manuals and stake sets.
Regards
Mike
 
Posts: 1107 | Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia in the USA | Registered: February 08, 2015
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

Vincent,

Definitely looks better!

Smile
 
Posts: 4861 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
posted
well the cleaning starts with soaking in paint thinners to soften the rust. Next i took the worst ones needing extreme rust extraction, covered the working end with masking tape to protect while bead blasting with very fine virgin glass bead. air pressure reduced to 38 pounds for slow removal of rust. then i used a very fine bristle stainless steal wire wheel to lightly polish. on the working end i used a stationary buffing wheel on the lowest speed to just put a nice shine for appearance. to regain the mirror surface on the stumps and stakes requiring the same treatment i used a pink porcelain piece used for lath work on special materials. holding the part in hand, you use small figure 8's with watch oil to restore the surface. you could also make a set up for use in your watch maker lath. on those not needing drastic restoration i used 0000 steel wool with paint thinners on it, just working the stake back and forth. i say, you never have enough tools but having the correct on is what counts! i love this watch stuff...Jim

P.S. enclosed is another finished restoration of mine...

 
Posts: 30 | Location: Evergreen, Colorado in the USA  | Registered: January 21, 2018
Administrative Assistant
Picture of Dr. Debbie Irvine
posted

I can appreciate the time that you put in to making it right. You sure have a lot of patience!

Lindell always says that having the right tools is very important.

 
Posts: 4861 | Location: Northern Ohio in the U.S.A. | Registered: December 04, 2002
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