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1908 GUSTAV BECKER "Click" to Login or Register
 
Picture of David A. Garas
posted
Here are some pictures of a 1908 Becker I restored for a customer.

Before
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Rockford, Illinois U.S.A. | Registered: October 02, 2004
Picture of David A. Garas
posted
Here is one after I polished the parts all by hand.

All apart
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Rockford, Illinois U.S.A. | Registered: October 02, 2004
Picture of David A. Garas
posted
And here is the restored clock

All finished
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Rockford, Illinois U.S.A. | Registered: October 02, 2004
IHC Life Member
Picture of John D. Duvall
posted
Beautiful work David! I bet you had a happy customer!!
 
Posts: 1122 | Location: Arizona U.S.A. | Registered: January 21, 2003
Picture of Tom Seymour
posted
David,
Nice job. Those disc pendulum models are very nice. Great job on the restoration.

Did you put a lacquer on after polishing. If so, which one did you use?


Tom
 
Posts: 2539 | Location: Mount Angel, Oregon in the U.S.A. | Registered: November 19, 2002
IHC Member 234
Picture of Jim Cope
posted
...very nice David...excellent work... Wink


Jim
IHC#234
 
Posts: 875 | Location: Kingsville, Ontario, Canada | Registered: April 16, 2003
Picture of David A. Garas
posted
Tom I did not use a clear coat I have not mastered that yet. Confused I do put on 100% carnauba wax that prevents it from tarnishing for quite a few years. Smile
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Rockford, Illinois U.S.A. | Registered: October 02, 2004
Picture of Greg Reeves
posted
Beautiful! I have some 400's I would like to do(brass cases). When you master the "clear coat", let me know. I have tried sprays, painting and dunking. It may just be one of those things I "can't" do. I have tried many times and will probably try many more times however.

greg
 
Posts: 499 | Location: Genoa, New York U.S.A. | Registered: November 06, 2003
posted
David great restoration job.It made the clock look alot better overall.
How did you keep the lacquer out of the pivot holes and places where you do not want it to go?
 
Posts: 2135 | Registered: June 01, 2003
Picture of David A. Garas
posted
Thanks Kevin. That is were I have the problem I don't put on a clear coat. I do use a 100% carnauba wax which last for a long time. I just have not mastered putting on a clear coat yet. The guys I have talked to that do use a clear coat do not do the plates because of the pivot holes. With the wax it is not so much of a problem.
Dave
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Rockford, Illinois U.S.A. | Registered: October 02, 2004
posted
Applying lacquer is more technique than any thing else. I have found that 3 or 4 light even coats with light polishing in between coats gives the best results. The best results are achieved by allowing the lacquer to dry completely between coats (as much as 24 hrs) This allows the lacquer to harden and to polish and not haze when you "buff" between coats. When applying, start by spraying the lacquer can away from the surface so as to not have the lacquer "spitting" on the intended surface and uneven results. A practice surface is probably best to figure how far to hold the spray can from the intended surface to apply a light coat. It is always best to build up with light coats than a lot of lacquer applied quickly and piled up.

A couple techniques that help achieve desired results (tips from a professional restorer):

Stay away from rubbing and buffing edges. He told me "do the center of want you want to polish, the edges will take care of themselves". You purposely get close to those edges and you will wear though way before you finish the main area.

Those that are wanting a "crazed or aged finish" especially in blending in a small repaired area of a wood surface. Hold your lacquer can farther away from the intended area. The lacquer will actually harden in the air before in gets to the surface and will give your piece that nice "aged" look and not a bright and shiny repaired surface. I have found that holding the can approx. 18-24 inches from the surface area and again, applying multiple light coats works best for me. Practice on a separate piece and adjust your results to match to the existing surface. With this technique, it is best to cover and mask any area where you don't want overspray on because of spray drift.

Good luck and hopefully this little bit of knowledge will help someone.

Derek
 
Posts: 172 | Location: Lexington, Kentucky U.S.A. | Registered: July 06, 2004
posted
Thanks David and Derek, i think i will try the wax method first.I don,t want to be bothering with the extra problems of lacquer.I would like to in the future try lacquer.I have some 400 day clocks that need cleaning and polishing and run well.I just want to make them look better and age and get a nice patina on the finish. Smile Razz
 
Posts: 2135 | Registered: June 01, 2003
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