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Restoration, not really. More like manufacturinging at school.... "Click" to Login or Register
 
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
Hi!
Just want to show what projects I have been into the last two years from time to time while at the Swedish School of Watchmaking. Yes, there are a lot I still can do and some misstakes aswell. I feel quite proud anyway. If someone would have show me these two years ago and say, you will do this, I would really not believe him. This have made me really in for next challenge. Wonder what it´s gonna be?

A table clock wich a bridge in front of the plate to make the escapement visible. Inspired by golden bridge (Corum) and the mostley French and American clocks with the visible brocot escapement. Only a very few minor parts and the wheels (exept one) and pinions are not made by my self. I have only formed them for a new look.

A Skeletonized ETA 6497 mvt housed in a MeisterSinger case. I call it "Paisley watch"


Bernhard Schmidt


 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
Table clock


Bernhard Schmidt


Table clock
 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
escapement


Bernhard Schmidt


 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
The pendulum


Bernhard Schmidt


 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
IHC Life Member
South-Bend Expert
Picture of Frank Kusumoto
posted
I really like how the skeletonization matches on front and back. Very good planning and a very nice design. Did you plate the bridges, mainplate and barrel in gold?

Frank "407" Kusumoto
 
Posts: 1045 | Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A. | Registered: October 08, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
Yes Frank, they are gold plated and the screws are blued, if you call the warming teqnique that. Thanks.


Bernhard Schmidt
 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
.....and the bridges and main plate are like frosted (BLASTED) on the surface. To get this result I used a really rough kind of polishing paste on a metall plate. None of the parts are made by me exept for the winding stem. I have vibrate and pinned and adjust the balance and hairspring aswell.


Bernhard Schmidt
 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
IHC Life Member
South-Bend Expert
Picture of Frank Kusumoto
posted
Well Bernhard, that's just watch school. It may be the first and last time you attach a collet, vibrate a hairspring, pin a stud and poise the balance all on one watch. Fun to know how to do though, for sure.

When you used the rough polish paste did you go down past the nickel/rhodium/gold plating, down to the brass? If you did apparently you're going to leave it like that. What tools did you use for the skeletonization? What machine did you use to make a hole in the ratchet wheel?

I really love that clock also. The classic "straight" escapement is one of my favorites, especially when I'm trying to explain how a timepiece works! It looks like you polished and plated most of the clock.

Best,

Frank "407" Kusumoto
 
Posts: 1045 | Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A. | Registered: October 08, 2004
Picture of Bernhard Schmidt
posted
Frank,

yes fun to know, and I really think that a great deal of knowledge comes with it, like working with (adjust) the hairspring for exemple. To make it flat, centered and so on after puting it in to the watch. At least it have give me mutch concerning especially this.

The ratchet wheel, similar to the return bar spring, I dehardened at first. I drilled it and filed it, hardened and "warmtreated" it. Finaly i polished both of these parts. The ratchet wheel blasted as described above.

Yes, I came down to the brass and then plated it.

The tools I use was a saw, small files and a highly poliched kind of file to create "angles" on the edges (back of the mvt).

The Clock is just polished, not plated but warnished to keep the lustre. I have some polish work left for the wheels and pendulum for exemple.

I really agree with you. I also like these line train clocks. Especially the hi grade wall clocks. Apropos of that I recently visited Greenwish and the Royal observatory. Harrisons "H" clocks are really astonish to see in reality but also these Graham and Tompion Wall clocks among others are such buties. Please don´t missunderstand, I do not compare my clock to any of these clocks Smile but I really like them and maybe the decision to build the clock with the line train is a bit of inspiration from these kind of clocks I think.

Thanks Frank.


Bernhard Schmidt
 
Posts: 427 | Location: Västerås in Swedem | Registered: January 02, 2004
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