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HAMILTON 934 "Click" to Login or Register 
IHC Member 1357
posted
Just added this one to my collection. 17jewels,
S/N 146348=1901 My
research shows 5111 made. Fresh COA and Mainspring
by Paul Davis. Any comments welcome.

Regards
Roger

..
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
IHC Member 1357
posted
Case back

..
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
IHC Member 1357
posted
Movement

..
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
IHC Member 1610
Picture of Harry J. Hyaduck Sr.
posted
Very nice! I have two of them and I did not realize there were so few made.
 
Posts: 3300 | Location: Georgia in the USA | Registered: September 22, 2011
IHC President
Life Member
Picture of Lindell V. Riddle
posted

Roger,

Although a good quality watch, Hamilton's Grade 934 was not originally sold as nor was it considered by them to be a Railroad Grade movement, that designation is what counts heavily to most collectors. The "Adjusted" on a 934 meant "Adjusted to Temperature" but not to the "5-Positions" required of a Railroad Grade Movement.

Easy to remember this fact, Hamilton did not market any 18-size grade number below 936 as a Railroad Watch. The Grade 936 was their first RR Grade Watch, the one that got them going as "The Watch of Railroad Accuracy" and beginning in 1893 production helped to build their well-deserved reputation.

Hamilton's 934 originally did come with a Double-Sunk dial (nothing below the 934 did) what you have is "period correct" and it is one of the right dials. Your particular dial is difficult to find in top condition and from the picture it looks good.

The hour hand on your watch (number 114) is broken-off short, the minutes hand is a number 111 and the correct "ball-end" seconds hand appears to be what you have. My only concern would be with finding a matched pair of hour and minutes hands and if it were my watch I would seek out a number 111 style hour hand to match your existing minutes hand. That is because hour hands are far easier to find as the minutes hands were often bent or knocked off the movement by the user. Notice the "swell" or wider area part-way out from the center of the minutes hand (unlike your hour hand) that is what you might want to match-up if you choose to upgrade the hour hand.

As to how many were made, the Ehrhardt Hamilton Book shows the 934 as 3,310 from 1900 through 1909 production. To know how many numbers were designated (blocked) for the 934 an examination of the Gelson List looking through the columns for each 934 listing, recording the spans, doing the math and adding them up would likely get you close to the correct answer.

You have a very nice example Smile not "picking-on" your watch, just letting you know what I would want to know.

Hope this information is of help to you and others.

Be well my friends,

Lindell

Wink
 
Posts: 10521 | Location: Northeastern Ohio in the USA | Registered: November 19, 2002
IHC Life Member
Picture of Ethan Lipsig
posted
Lindell, I wonder if you are correct in saying that "a Railroad Grade . . . designation is what counts heavily to most [pocket watch] collectors." I don't doubt that this true for IHC 185 members, a self-selected group, but I seriously question whether it is true for the entire collector universe, including non-US collectors. I for one do not have, as far as I know, a single railroad grade watch among my 400 pocket watches.

I don't doubt that railroad grade watches generally were fine, robust timekeepers, but they generally were utilitarian watches produced in large quantities. Other watches then were being made that were equally fine, if not better, timekeepers, but that were much more stylish and much more expensive than railroad grade watches when initially marketed. Furthermore, some of the railroad grade requirements were parochial, such as actually or effectively requiring them to be made in the U.S., or arguably silly (e.g., requiring them to be lever set, when other alternatives were more convenient and just as safe, e.g., pin-set).

There is nothing wrong with collecting railroad grade watches, but I doubt that more than half of pocket watch collectors worldwide focus on them. There is a whole other collecting world out there. To illustrate, among other things, I collect certain makers, such C.H. Meylan and Touchon, certain models, such as Elgin C.H. Hulburds, 21j Elgin convertibles and Waltham American Watch Co. grades, and certain types, such as hermetic watches.
 
Posts: 1350 | Location: Pasadena, California USA | Registered: November 11, 2005
IHC Member 1357
posted
Thanks Lindell, I see now that it is not a RRG. The hand was changed after the picture as they became available to me. Looking at the Gelson list I came up with 5,111 with one run being 3!

Roger
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
IHC Life Member
Picture of Larry Lamphier
posted
Interesting Roger, but my Hamilton Watch Co Identification book shows that number between 1900 and 1909 as being 3,310.

Regards,
Larry being
 
Posts: 2838 | Location: Northeastern United States | Registered: February 28, 2010
IHC Member 1357
posted
Interesting Larry. By looking at the Gelson list I show the first year as being 1894 and the last as 1909. I wonder if all the s/n blocks were actually produced.

Roger
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
IHC Life Member
Picture of Larry Lamphier
posted
Good question that I cannot answer! Frown

Regards,
Larry
 
Posts: 2838 | Location: Northeastern United States | Registered: February 28, 2010
IHC Member 1338
posted
Nice 934, Roger!

As far as RR Grade or no, I'm not sure how it is now days, but in the past guys collecting 18 size Hamiltons for instance were more interested in the GRADE than whether or not it was RR Approved.

That is to say it was kind of like pieces to a puzzle. There may be an 18S hamilton collector out there who has most everything else but not a 934. Hence that Grade would be attractive to him because he doesn't yet have it. 934s can be tough to acquire, especially in the condition like Roger's watch here. Murphy's Law applies you can find 2 or 3 when you're not looking for a particular grade, but when you ARE there's none to be had.

And how many of us have had opportunities to buy a watch but passed on it for whatever reason only to wish later we'd have bought it? I know I have...


Tom Dunn...
TIME MACHINE
www.myrailroadwatch.com
.
 
Posts: 2717 | Location: Ramsey, Illinois in the USA | Registered: December 15, 2008
IHC Member 1357
posted
Tom, I agree with you. I do collect the RRG's but I
also can not pass up a beautiful watch with low production.

Regards
Roger
 
Posts: 3963 | Location: Carbon, Texas in the USA | Registered: January 24, 2010
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